Despite the furious variation that led to the CDC’s recent recommendation that all Americans, regardless of vaccination status, wear masks indoors in most parts of the country, some still feel uncomfortable with the demand for evidence. Brides like Mariah Hughes of Bangor, Maine, would rather use the honor system.

“I think I can make an educated guess if my family and friends are vaccinated,” she said. Ms. Hughes and her fiancé Stephen Cormier had planned to get married in September but postponed their date until next June as the photographer they wanted to work with was firmly booked. You are less frustrated than relieved. “With the Delta variant that is so widespread, we feel we have made the right decision,” she said.

Not that she or anyone can rely on Covid to be history next year. In Denver, Brittney Griffin, the event manager at the Blanc wedding venue, is ready to pull masks out again, despite the high vaccination rates in Colorado. “We haven’t had to do that yet,” but she said new mandates could come. “Unfortunately we’ve been through this before, so if it becomes necessary again we’ll at least be prepared.”

Niche players like McKenzi Taylor, the founder of Cactus Collective Weddings in Las Vegas, could be one of the few whose businesses got back on their feet thanks to Delta. Ms. Taylor plans small weddings in remote, outdoor settings.

“We’re usually people’s second choice,” she said, which means that most of the couples they contact do so because Covid has spoiled their original plans. With the virus outbreak in 2020, it saw bookings surge by 30 percent. Now business is booming again. “Unfortunately we are in a completely new cycle with Delta. I get a lot of calls asking ‘How soon can we get married?’ “

However, timing cannot be everything. “In four years we will still have breakthrough infections,” said Dr. Amesh Adalja, Infectious Disease Specialist and Senior Scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security. “It will still be a problem.”